Cardiff Bay. Source: grahamwell (Wikimedia Commons)
Conservatism, Character and Constitution

Time for change for Wales

Since the formation of the Senedd, there has not been a Conservative Government in Wales. However as recent referenda and elections have shown volatility amongst the electorate is increasing signalling a desire for change writes Samantha Chohan.

This desire for change has the potential to bring about a realignment in party loyalties, reshaping the political landscape. The fate of the Labour Party in Scotland who suffered staggering losses to the SNP after failing to read the mood of the country shows that they have no Divine Right to Rule. Our country has many similarities to Scotland with perpetually offended Plaid and Labour laziness and arrogance. I believe that we may be closer to a watershed election than we realise. 

There are clear parallels with the 1945 election and the elections we will face in the coming decade. Our country has suffered the internal conflict of the Brexit debate, the tragedy of the Covid pandemic and faces danger in the form of environmental challenges. In 1945 The desire for something good to come from tragedy was harnessed to build a country “fit for heroes”. Unfortunately, it was also a Trojan horse for decades of decline that required painful readjustment. We cannot allow this to happen again.

The things we hold dear as Conservatives such as the union must evolve. Faith in our country, ourselves, and our families are the antidote to the fear of Brexit that is still being spread by a biased media and remain fundamentalists. From the trauma and suffering of the Pandemic we must articulate a future based on hope. Our people want good to come from this tragedy. Hope for a better future with more opportunities to work, study, and improve their quality of life by removing overbearing state regulation and increasing innovation and choice in health and education. On the environment we need to unite society, the state, and especially the individual to rise to the challenges that we face as we have in the past. A country of incentivised micro generating homes actively contributing to energy security in a personal rather than abstract sense would be a policy worthy of inclusion in any conservative manifesto and the embodiment of thrift, personal responsibility and expansion of choice. 

Once again, the Conservatives must resist the creeping dead hand of the state and the siren calls of an unnecessary activist government, excessive regulation and the stifling of our freedoms by articulating a new vision for our country. By falling back on our tried and tested methods to address the challenges we face we can restore freedoms, temporarily suspended, during the pandemic and expand them where possible. The choices our people have as consumers of both private and public goods and services must be expanded. Why is it routine to choose my mobile phone provider but I need to have permission from the Head of Midwifery to give birth in my choice of hospital? We cannot allow the only vision of the future to be articulated by Socialists and Separatists nor can we only stand for the status quo. Wales is getting ready for a radical reapplication of Conservative principles. We must show the way to a healthier, wealthier, freer, greener, better educated Wales.